Dan Perjovschi comments on the present, which he captures and synthesises with an irony that transcends specific political and cultural contexts. Although his academic training, based on Impressionism and Social Realism, was characteristic of a Communist country, after decorating his entire house with drawings and cartoons in 1988 to surprise his wife, Perjovschi decided to continue to work in these genres.

Since then he has devoted himself to creating drawings on the walls of public and institutional spaces, and his works ironically—though not cynically—remind us that art can still make us reflect on the world in which we live. A thick black felt pen in his pocket is the only tool he carries, wherever he goes, always on the lookout for an empty wall to fill with simple lines that are often accompanied by short texts—slogans or messages—that contextualise and comment on surrounding reality. Ranging from the economy, capitalism and globalisation to religion, fashion or the art world, Perjovschi's topics provide humorous recipes for surviving a disastrous present.

Straightforward, easily understood and highly critical, this commentator of the present gradually paved his way in the art world until 1999, when he made an international name for himself in contemporary art displaying his works in the Romanian Pavilion at that year's edition of the Venice Biennale.
El País. 17–11–2011 El País. 17–11–2011, 2011 (detail). 18 ballpoint drawing on newspaper. 39 x 57,5 cm each [Ref# 40650]El Mundo. 17–11–2011 El Mundo. 17–11–2011, 2011 (detail). 18 ballpoint drawing on newspaper. 39 x 57,5 cm each [Ref# 40649]The Herald Tribune. 17–11–2011 The Herald Tribune. 17–11–2011, 2011 (detail). 6 ballpoint drawing on newspaper. 58 x 69,5 cm each [Ref# 40647]The Herald Tribune. 17–11–2011 The Herald Tribune. 17–11–2011, 2011 (detail). 6 ballpoint drawing on newspaper. 58 x 69,5 cm each [Ref# 40647]  Photo: Sabina Arena © Dan Perjovski

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